BuildASoil is Getting Better! We just hired some help and this is what you can expect...

April 21, 2014 0 Comments

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What is Heartbleed? Announcement: BuildASoil is Secure

April 11, 2014 0 Comments

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Tutorial: Make your Own Compost Properly

March 29, 2014 0 Comments

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Local Compost? Learn how to interpret a compost analysis in this blog post.

March 27, 2014 0 Comments

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Have you been to eurekaspringsorganics.com Lately?

March 27, 2014 0 Comments

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What is Rejuvelac? Fermented Grainberry Beverage

March 21, 2014 0 Comments

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"Bread From Stones" Free E-Book on Rock Dust from 1894

March 21, 2014 0 Comments

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The Truth about Humic Acid Products - Must Read

March 20, 2014 0 Comments

Terminology of Humus-related Materials

Humus--product resulting from decay of organic matter.  Contains both humic and non-humic material.

Humin--the alkali-insoluble fraction of leonardite.  (The usage of this term does not correspond exactly with the usage by other workers.) .

Humic substances--(plural) the collective name for the acid radicals found in humic matter.  Typically separated from humic matter by alkaline extraction.

Humic acid--(singular) the acid radical found in humic matter which is soluble in alkali but insoluble in acid, methyl ethyl ketone, and methyl alcohol.

Humate--the salts of humic acids, collectively, or the salts of humic acid specifically.  (The usage must be determined from the context.)

Fulvic acid--the acid radical found in humic matter which is soluble in alkali, acid, methyl ethyl ketone, and methyl alcohol.

Fulvates--the salts of fulvic acid.

Leonardite--a soft brown coal-like deposit usually found in conjunction with deposits of lignite.

Lignite--a type of soft coal.

UNDERSTANDING THE DIFFERENCE

Various forms of raw humus and humates exist including those produced by composting, industrial by-products and those created during ancient geological events. However, for the purpose of using humates and derivatives including humic and fulvic acids, we will provide a brief overview of what you, the buyer of products, should understand if you want the best product for your money. When shopping around, it is in your best interest to know where a company sources their raw materials, processing methods, their scientific knowledge of the products and scientific research documents to back their claims. We encourage you to explore this and remember that price is not the most important factor when deciding on a product. There's a lot of junk out there so buyer beware! 

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Liming Agents: What's the deal with all these products?

March 13, 2014 0 Comments

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Newer Article On Triacontanol & Potential Benefits For Medicinal Plants

March 08, 2014 0 Comments

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Triacontanol - As a Growth Stimulant.

March 08, 2014 0 Comments

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Cytokinin: A Plant Hormone. (Coconut Water and Corn SST)

March 05, 2014 0 Comments

Cytokinins

Have you been reading about using Coconut Water or Corn SST??? 

What are these Cytokinins anyways? Check out this detailed information.

Nature of Cytokinins:
Cytokinins are compounds with a structure resembling adenine which promote cell division and have other similar functions to kinetin. Kinetin was the first cytokinin discovered and so named because of the compounds ability to promote cytokinesis (cell division). Though it is a natural compound, It is not made in plants, and is therefore usually considered a "synthetic" cytokinin (meaning that the hormone is synthesized somewhere other than in a plant). The most common form of naturally occurring cytokinin in plants today is called zeatin which was isolated from corn (Zea mays).

Cytokinins have been found in almost all higher plants as well as mosses, fungi, bacteria, and also in tRNA of many prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Today there are more than 200 natural and synthetic cytokinins combined. Cytokinin concentrations are highest in meristematic regions and areas of continuous growth potential such as roots, young leaves, developing fruits, and seeds (Arteca, 1996; Mauseth, 1991; Raven, 1992; Salisbury and Ross, 1992).

 

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